Black Rabbit Hall - Eve Chase

Black Rabbit Hall

By Eve Chase

  • Release Date - Published: 2016-02-09
  • Book Genre: Fiction & Literature
  • Author: Eve Chase
Our rating: 5/5 stars

4 Score: 4 (From 46 Ratings)

Black Rabbit Hall Eve Chase read online review & book description:

“For fans of Kate Morton and Daphne du Maurier, Black Rabbit Hall is an obvious must-read.”—Bookpage
 
A secret history. A long-ago summer. A house with an untold story.
 
Amber Alton knows that the hours pass differently at Black Rabbit Hall, her London family’s Cornish country house, where no two clocks read the same. Summers there are perfect, timeless. Not much ever happens. Until, one terrible day, it does.

More than three decades later, Lorna is determined to be married within the grand, ivy-covered walls of Pencraw Hall, known as Black Rabbit Hall among the locals. But as she’s drawn deeper into the overgrown grounds, she soon finds herself ensnared within the house’s labyrinthine history, overcome with a need for answers about her own past and that of the once-golden family whose memory still haunts the estate.

Eve Chase's debut novel is a thrilling spiral into the hearts of two women separated by decades but inescapably linked by the dark and tangled secrets of Black Rabbit Hall.

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Posted Reviews

  • Great read for Coronavirus times

    4
    By A weird sister
    I loved this wonderful tale of family, the massive old home and all the sweet and bitter of family lives. A well done story of family lives.
  • Great book. I loved it. A vintage recipe that is both savory and sweet.

    5
    By psimppyg
    This book was VERY good. It is slow going in the beginning, but Eve Chase writes with amazingly vivid imagery that will stick in my head forever. I felt every emotion possible throughout the book. What I found to be one of my favorite things though, was the way the Author truly helped the reader to FEEL what it is to grow up in a family with siblings you love, parents you adore. Although struck by unstoppable tragedy, wicked stepmothers, forced estrangement, and oceans of guilt, the relationships you form growing up in close knit family are ones you hold in your heart forever. That feeling of love between brothers and sisters, a mother and her children is the purest love there is in my opinion, and this book swept up into my soul and made me cry. I listened to it on audiobook, I did not read it. It was not a fast listen, and I admit I had to rewind every so often if my listening comprehension skills tried to wander, but I think is somewhat normal. However drawn out it may have seemed, I disagree with a previous review. It WAS NOT boring, and held me to the very end. I needed to know the last bit on each of the fabulous and real life characters, and even when I felt satisfied with the ending, the Author gave me more with the epilogue. It was vintage, savory, and sweet. I would recommend to anyone. Truly a story to be repeated. I know I will put it on my all time fave list, and think of it for quite some time.
  • Boring Novel!

    1
    By Kris Anderson, The Avid Reader
    Black Rabbit Hall by Eve Chase is a very slow book. The story tells of Lorna and Jon looking for a place to get married. They find Black Rabbit Hall (aka Pencraw Hall). Lorna visited the hall with her mother when she was a child (her mother recently passed away). Then the story goes back to the late 1960s with the Alton children. Amber, Toby, Barney, and Kitty spent their school vacations at the hall. Their mother, Nancy called it Black Rabbit Hall because of the rabbits that came out at sunset and you saw their black shadows across the lawn. Their mother died at Easter when she was out looking for her youngest son (off playing and then it started storming) on horseback (got thrown and broke her neck). The father, Hugo quickly rebounds and married Caroline Shawcross (she pursued him). Caroline brings her son, Lucian with her into the marriage. Lucian and Amber are attracted to each other, but it is forbidden (like that will stop them). Caroline is not fond of the children and there will be many changes to the family (Toby does not handle the changes). When Lorna visits Black Rabbit Hall, she encounters Dill (the housekeeper/cook) and Caroline. Caroline has opened the hall for events (needs the money). What happened to Hugo Alton and his children? Why is Lorna drawn to Black Rabbit Hall (she becomes obsessed)? Lorna gets a chance to stay at the hall and find some answers. I found Black Rabbit Hall to be an extremely boring book. It tried to be a mystery, but it did not succeed. I just found Black Rabbit Hall to be odd. We get the story from two different perspectives: Lorna’s and Amber’s (the majority of the book is from Amber’s point-of-view). The Amber section reads more like a young adult novel (she finds love at fifteen). The two stories go back and forth until we see how they are connected. I just found it dull and uninteresting (reading this book was like trekking through the desert). There is some very graphic violence (it is awful) in the book as well as sex and foul language. I did not enjoy Black Rabbit Hall (as you can tell). It sounded like such an intriguing and mysterious book (from the synopsis). I think the book (the idea) had potential, but the writer was not able to pull it off. I give Black Rabbit Hall 1 out of 5 stars. This book was just not for me. If you are looking for a book to help you sleep, then read Black Rabbit Hall. I received a complimentary copy of Black Rabbit Hall from NetGalley and First to Read in exchange for an honest review.

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